Archive for the ‘Cyber Security’ Category

 

Updated: Forward these 7 Minimum Security Requirements for Your Small Service Providers

Many organizations outsource to service providers that are not cyber-secure. It is common for companies to experience a significant security breach that originated at a third party. Just ask Target. Forward this request to your small outsourced providers asking them to do these seven things. Continue reading ‘Updated: Forward these 7 Minimum Security Requirements for Your Small Service Providers’


New York City is Providing Automatic Protection for all iPhone Users, and So Can Your City

As the City of Atlanta is still recovering from the massive ransomware attack on March 22, NYC is launching a program that provides secure Internet access for residents and visitors at no charge. Continue reading ‘New York City is Providing Automatic Protection for all iPhone Users, and So Can Your City’


How Buying a Spare Printer can Vastly Improve Your Cyber Security

Imagine a scenario when an IT professional knows there is an urgent security problem in your firewall that needs to be addressed. And at the same time, your multi-function printer is broken. What problem will the IT professional address first? Continue reading ‘How Buying a Spare Printer can Vastly Improve Your Cyber Security’


When Trusted Programs get Hacked: An Attacker May Be Putting Germs on Your Toothbrush

It is like someone borrowing your toothbrush without you knowing, and you get sick from their germs. Think of programs on computers as being something that can be used to make you sick. As 2018 continues, more attackers will use trusted software as a vector to infect networks. Continue reading ‘When Trusted Programs get Hacked: An Attacker May Be Putting Germs on Your Toothbrush’


Three Serious Trends to Watch Out for in Cyber Security

First, are your servers backed up to the cloud? The use of online backup will continue to grow. Organizations are finding out, sometimes the hard way, Continue reading ‘Three Serious Trends to Watch Out for in Cyber Security’


Protecting and Restricting iPads, iPhones, and Android Devices

Because many families, and business professionals, received new tablets for the holidays, it is important to consider security. Families, as well as businesses, may choose to restrict permissions on devices. Here’s how: Continue reading ‘Protecting and Restricting iPads, iPhones, and Android Devices’


A Secret Operating System is Running Inside Your Computers

If this gives you a sinking feeling, it should. What most people don’t know is that, if your computer uses an Intel brand CPU, there is a hidden microprocessor dedicated to running a second operating system called MINIX. And MINIX is running right now. Continue reading ‘A Secret Operating System is Running Inside Your Computers’


Wireless Security is Broken & What You Need to Do

Many organizations rely on a wireless password to protect their Wi-Fi networks. Behind the scenes, that password is used as part of a security protocol called WPA2. An attack, dubbed KRACK, has been announced that breaks that security. Continue reading ‘Wireless Security is Broken & What You Need to Do’


What You Need to Do to Protect Yourself after the Equifax Breach

You may be one of the 143 million people affected by the Equifax hacking breach that was announced yesterday.

Data stolen may include contact information, dates of birth, driver’s license information, and Social Security numbers. Attackers can make money selling the information to people who could steal your identity and take out loans in your name.

Place a credit freeze on your credit report. To do so, contact all four: Experian, Innovis, Trans Union, and, you guessed it, Equifax. In total, you’ll spend less than $75 to place the freeze.

A credit freeze stops people for gaining access to your credit report. It is difficult for an imposter to borrow money if a lender cannot check a credit report first.

Remember, credit monitoring, though good, sometimes only catches bad things when it is too late.

A security freeze is more effective, and lasts longer, than a fraud alert.

Additionally, watch out for anything odd or abnormal on your bank statements. Download your credit reports every quarter to see what is on them. One way to see your credit reports is to use a service such as annualcreditreport dot com

The FTC gives suggestions about avoiding and handling identity theft at consumer.ftc dot gov/features/feature-0014-identity-theft

Equifax has set up a website equifaxsecurity2017 dot com for people to see if their information was part of the breach. However, many people have been experiencing problems with that website.

Executives – FYI: Reports say that the attack did not result from social engineering. In other words, nobody clicked a bad link in an email. The attackers got in because an Equifax website was insecure. Have you had someone check the security of your website lately? If your site simply displays static information, you are at a much lower risk than if your site has a place for someone to login and/or look up information via your site.

Reports say that the breach may have happened as early as May, and Equifax discovered the breach on July 29. The time between when attackers compromise a system, and when it is discovered, is called dwell time. The best thing to do is to stop hackers from getting in to begin with. Keep security a top priority at your organization! The attackers are counting on you to overlook important steps.

Please forward this to anyone you care about…


Fix A Computer in Minutes and It Works Almost Every Time

I was stranded in the Portland airport last night because of a mechanical failure on the first flight. You’ve had similar situations for sure. What would your travel experience be like if the airlines could immediately reset a plane to be brand new if it breaks? Continue reading ‘Fix A Computer in Minutes and It Works Almost Every Time’